Asian garden inspiration: DIY succulents in a stone bowl

succulents in stone bowl tended.wordpress.com

Here is the inspiration for the project: the entry garden of our a house our friends rented in Sri Lanka during their trip around the world. The bowl of flowers in water near the front entry attracts positive energy and luck.

sri lanka entry garden tended.wordrpress.com

sri lanka flower bowl tended.wordpress.com

A bowl of flowers in water near my front entry will only attract raccoons and my thirsty labrador retriever, so I tried for a similar effect with succulents.¬†I selected a couple of varieties of Dudleya with rosettes similar to the white flowers with their pointed petals and planted them in concrete bowls from Vietnam which I bought at Filoli’s annual plant sale. Here are similar planters at Terrain.

Dudleyas are the easiest succulents, you just plant them. To start a new plant, just snap a rosette off at the stem and stick it in the dirt. They’ll even root and form a new rosette from a single leaf. They are much more fragile than Echevaria so handle them carefully.

succulents in concrete bowl tended.wordpress.comsucculents in concrete bowl tended.wordpress.com

Here is the finished result on my porch.

succulents in a concrete bowl tended.wordpress.com

 

Advertisements

Yet more succulent-container combinations

mixed dudleyas tended.wordpress.com

These are Dudleyas. I love the mix of forms, all in varying shades of silver, and the way the silver is set off by the white ceramic pot. Dudleyas are super easy to root from just a leaf. Just lay a leave on top of loose potting soil, keep the soil a little moist, and bam! roots and leaves. You can also just break off a rosette and replant.

sedum tended.wordpress.com

Sedum in a turquoise ceramic pot I bought at an estate sale. For this pot, I like plants that spill over its squat, round form. When your sedum gets a little leggy like this one, just cut off the ones that don’t look good at the base of each stem. Trim the stem close to the leaves and tuck it back in your pot.

Haworthia tended.wordpress.com

Haworthia growing in another estate sale find. This combination gives me a southwest/70s/midcentury vibe. Haworthia is a slow grower, but eventually it will get big enough for you to divide and repot. With this one, I have NOT had luck snapping off a rosette and replanting it.

echeveria tended.wordpress.com

Echeveria ‘Jade Point’ in a red ceramic pot. I like the chunky forms of both the succulent and the pot, and the red tips of the leaves with the red ceramic.